Helmholtz Innovation Labs: HySPRINT at HZB

HZB will be setting up the new Helmholtz HySPRINT Innovation Lab for jointly developing new combinations of materials and processes in energy applications with commercial partners. Silicon and metal-organic perovskite crystals will be the centre point of the Lab’s work. The Helmholtz Association is supporting the project for the next five years with 1.9 million Euros from its Initiative and Networking Fund, with additional contributions from HZB itself as well as from industry.

The Helmholtz Association is supporting a total of seven Helmholtz Innovation Labs in order to strengthen the transfer of research results to the applications domain. The Association is making about twelve million Euros available over the next five years for setting up and operating the Innovation Labs.

The HZB proposal was selected from a field of 27 competing applications. HySPRINT stands for “Hybrid Silicon Perovskite Research, Integration & Novel Technologies”. It will focus on hybrid materials and components based on silicon and perovskite crystals able to be employed for energy conversion in photovoltaics as well as for solar hydrogen production.

“We intend to further develop silicon hybrid technology, liquid-phase crystallisation of silicon, nano-print lithography as well as the implementation of prototypes by means of 3D techniques for microcontacts in cooperation with industrial partners – and demonstrate the potential for industrial-scale production”, says Professor Bernd Rech from the HZB Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics.

The Innovation Lab will be set up as a core lab at HZB and will work closely with the HZB Institute PVcomB. Professor Anke Kaysser-Pyzalla, Scientific Director of HZB poitbs out: “HySPRINT will establish itself as a creative pillar of Technology Transfer at HZB and within the Helmholtz Association.”

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