HZB and TU Berlin: New joint research group at BESSY II

Prof. Birgit Kanngießer heads a joint research group on X-ray methods, which is funded by TU Berlin and HZB.

Prof. Birgit Kanngießer heads a joint research group on X-ray methods, which is funded by TU Berlin and HZB. © Martin Weinhold

Birgit Kanngießer is setting up a joint research group to combine X-ray methods in laboratories and at large-scale facilities. In particular, the physicist wants to investigate how X-ray experiments on smaller laboratory instruments can be optimally complemented with more complex experiments that are only possible at synchrotron sources such as BESSY II. 

Prof. Dr. Birgit Kanngießer is professor of analytical X-ray Physics at the Technische Universität Berlin, where she also heads a large research group. Together with the Max Born Institute she has build up BLiX (Berlin laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies), which brings established X-ray methods from the synchrotron into the laboratory. At BESSY II she was involved as one of the first users from the early on.

Now HZB and TU Berlin are funding a joint research group headed by Birgit Kanngießer to strengthen this cooperation. This should also accelerate the exchange of knowledge and technology between BESSY II and university laboratories.

The joint research group is called 'Combined X-ray methods at BLiX and BESSY II - SyncLab'. On the TU Berlin side, the Berlin laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) is integrated. Kanngießer will initially focus on evaluating how time-resolved measurements using near-edge X-ray spectroscopy in the soft X-ray range on smaller instruments and at BESSY II could complement each other. Further analytical and imaging X-ray methods are to follow in the future.

arö

You might also be interested in

  • Spintronics: Giant Rashba semiconductors show unconventional dynamics with potential applications
    Science Highlight
    06.07.2022
    Spintronics: Giant Rashba semiconductors show unconventional dynamics with potential applications
    Germanium telluride is a strong candidate for use in functional spintronic devices due to its giant Rashba-effect. Now, scientists at HZB have discovered another intriguing phenomenon in GeTe by studying the electronic response to thermal excitation of the samples. To their surprise, the subsequent relaxation proceeded fundamentally different to that of conventional semimetals. By delicately controlling the fine details of the underlying electronic structure, new functionalities of this class of materials could be conceived. 

  • Perowskit/Silizium-Tandemsolarzellen auf dem Weg vom Labor in die Produktion
    Science Highlight
    28.06.2022
    Perowskit/Silizium-Tandemsolarzellen auf dem Weg vom Labor in die Produktion
    KOALA/KOALA+ - Die am Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) errichtete Clusteranlage ermöglicht Wafer mit Perowskit/Silizium-Tandemsolarzellen im Vakuum herzustellen; ausreichend groß, um eine industrielle Produktion abzubilden. Diese weltweit einzigartige Anlage trägt dazu bei, neue industrienahe Prozesse, Materialien und Solarzellen zu entwickeln.
  • Atomic displacements in High-Entropy Alloys examined
    Science Highlight
    27.06.2022
    Atomic displacements in High-Entropy Alloys examined
    High-entropy alloys of 3d metals have intriguing properties that are interesting for applications in the energy sector. An international team at BESSY II has now investigated the local order on an atomic scale in a so-called high-entropy Cantor alloy of chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel. The results from combined spectroscopic studies and statistical simulations expand the understanding of this group of materials.